Comments that Parents Hear: “Let’s wait until your child is more … before trying that”

Recall the Law: Schools must ensure that:

“All children with disabilities … who are in need of special education and related services, are identified, located, and evaluated.” 300.111(a)

“A free appropriate public education (FAPE) must be available to all children residing in the state between the ages of 3 and 21”. “Each State must ensure that FAPE is available to any individual child with a disability who needs special education and related services, even though the child has not failed or been retained in a course or grade, and is advancing from grade to grade.” 300.101(a)&(c)

The IDEA includes the concept that students with disabilities should be taught in such a way that they can learn the general curriculum and progress toward the achievement level of their peers and also meet their IEP goals. If waiting would delay any of these things from occurring, then it would be inappropriate to wait.

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Annual IEP Review Meeting

An annual review is an IEP meeting required by the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) that must be held at least once a year. The meeting brings the IEP team together to review the student’s progress and program, and plan for the following year. As with other IEP meetings, the school district must provide parents with advance written notice of the meeting and consider their availability when scheduling the meeting. The meeting has these parts:

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4 Important Signs That Your Child’s IEP Is Working

The Individualized Education Program (or IEP) lays out the school’s commitment to provide special education and related services to your child. Developed annually, an IEP must be tailored to the individual needs of your child, with your involvement and input. Once formulated, the IEP becomes your roadmap to track your child’s progress throughout the year.

Here Are Four Important Signs That Your Child’s IEP Is Working:

1. Your child’s IEP has been reviewed by all teachers and related service providers.

All school personnel involved with your child’s education should be aware of and have access to your child’s IEP. This includes general education teachers, special education teachers, and any providers of related services such as speech/language.

Everyone should be knowledgeable about your child’s learning disability and its impact on all aspects of learning and behavior.  Everyone should be clear regarding any instructional support, accommodations, or other services that must be provided your child and the role each must play in making certain they are provided consistently.

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Parent Participation in IEP Meetings

IEP meetings can be emotional and overwhelming, but knowing how to work with the education team effectively is very important. You are a key member of the IEP team with the unique perspective that comes with the long view of your child’s developmental history, dreams, and resources.

Your participation is very important. As the IDEA notes:

“Almost 30 years of research and experience has demonstrated that the education of children with disabilities can be made more effective by… strengthening the role and responsibility of parents and ensuring that families … have meaningful opportunities to participate in the education of their children at school and at home.”

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Outcomes, Benefits and Drawbacks of Speech Therapy

What is the Desired Outcome of Speech Therapy?

The main goal of speech therapy is to improve communication. Some of the goals of speech therapy might include:

  • Improving coordination of speech muscles through strengthening and coordination exercises, sound repetition and imitation.
  • Improving communication between the brain and the body through visual and auditory aids such as mirrors and tape recorders.
  • Improving fluency through breathing exercises.
  • Enhancing the learning of language through language stimulation and the use of language through positive reinforcement.
  • Improving communication by helping a child learn another way to communicate which might include gestures, signing or augmentative communication devices (note use of these alternate forms of communication will serve to enhance speech development, not impair it).

Each child will have a different outcome depending on his or her particular challenges and abilities. The length of time in speech-language therapy depends on many factors such as severity of the problem, the frequency and consistency of therapy and the consistency of help at home.

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What Treatments are Available for Speech, Language and Motor Issues for Children with Autism?

The following therapies—also called “allied health services”—address symptoms commonly associated with autism, but are not specific to the disorder.

Speech-Language Therapy

Most autism behavioral intensive therapy programs include speech-language therapy. With a variety of techniques, speech-language therapy addresses a range of challenges often faced by persons with autism. For instance, some individuals on the autism spectrum do not speak, while others love to talk but have difficulty using conversational speech and/or understanding the nuances of language and nonverbal cues when talking with others.

Speech-language therapy is designed to coordinate the mechanics of speech with the meaning and social use of language. Such a program begins with an individual evaluation by a speech-language pathologist to assess an individual’s verbal aptitudes and challenges. From this evaluation, the pathologist sets goals that may include mastering spoken language and/or learning nonverbal communication skills such as signs or gestures. In each case, the goal is to help the person communicate in more useful and functional ways.

The speech language pathologist can provide therapy one-on-one, in a small group or in a classroom setting. Therapists who work with children have additional specialized training.

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What are Supplementary Aids and Services?

According to IDEA, Supplementary Aids and Services means, aids, services and other supports that are provided in regular education classes or other education-related settings to enable children with disabilities to be educated with nondisabled children to the maximum extent appropriate.

Supplementary Aids and Services can include changes in:

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7 Assessment Tools to Identify Strengths

It is part of federal law that students with special needs should have their strengths identified and described in their IEPs (IDEA 2004 Section 1414(d)(3)(A)). And yet, when I search the special education literature online, I find virtually nothing dedicated to identifying strengths in these students.

If a student is having difficulty in school, what they need is to have adults around them who see the very best in them, not just their deficits, disorders, and dysfunctions. I’ve created an informal 165-item strength-based checklist in my book “Neurodiversity in the Classroom: Strength-Based Strategies to Help Students with Special Needs Succeed in School and Life”. However, there are a number of formal strength-based assessments out there that should be utilized by special education personnel in identifying the strengths of students with special needs. Here are seven of them:

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Help! No Teachers are Trained to Work with My Son

My 10 year old son has Tourettes/OCD. His teachers do not understand his disability and what he is going through in class. They have no idea about inner tics. Their main concern is proper position of words on a page.  They are not trained to effectively work with him or teach him. His IEP meeting is in a week, what do I do?

What do you do? Turn to what IDEA says about support and training for school personnel.

IDEA envisions services that are provided to the parents or teachers of a child with a disability to help them to more effectively work with the child – that’s why “supports for school personnel” was included in this section of the law.

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Advances in Technology Make Driving More Accessible for Individuals with Disabilities

Only the ability to drive a vehicle can make unlimited freedom of travel possible. This is particularly true for a person with a disability.

Advances in technology have made private vehicle travel attainable, and even more preferable. More and more, persons with a disability are able to modify their vehicles and obtain an adaptive driver’s license to enhance their independence.

Driving allows persons with a disability to participate in activities when, where and how they want to without having to depend on others for transportation. It basically heightens a person’s ability to live life by his or her own plan.

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