Social skill is not a “service” but a functional skill necessary for daily living activities. Learn what the IDEA, the federal regulations, and the Commentary say about Present Levels of Functional Performance and IEP goals for functional skills.

Here’s an easy to read description about social skills from Psychology Today.

Your child’s IEP must include a description of her Present Levels of Academic Achievement and Functional Performance. This means what her strengths and weaknesses are – both in academics and in functional areas like social skills.

If your child has “functional needs” the school must meet these and address these needs with goals in the IEP.


Questions to Ask

Remember, you are part of the IEP team. You have input about your child’s needs and what services may be needed to meet these needs.

  • Does your daughter have challenges in the social skills area?
  • Is her weakness in social skills accurately described in the Present Levels?
  • Does her IEP include goals about how the school will meet these challenges?
  • Do the goals meet her needs?
  • Is she making measurable progress toward these goals?

You need to request a meeting of the IEP team to discuss your concerns and to review and revise the IEP.

More than likely, you are correct. 90 minutes of counseling a month is probably not what your daughter needs to help her learn to interact with friends and react appropriately to teasing or bullying.

For more information:

http://www.wrightslaw.com/blog/is-the-school-required-to-provide-social-skills-training/