Home/Tag: high expectations
20 02, 2019

Create a Climate of High Expectations in Your Child’s Program

2019-05-20T11:38:21-05:00

Too often expectations for children with special needs are not set high enough. When a high level of expectations is set, kids tend to strive to meet those expectations. Our kids want to be successful. It’s up to us to provide the environment for them to succeed.

Create a Climate of High Expectations in Your Child’s Program2019-05-20T11:38:21-05:00
3 07, 2017

The State of Learning Disabilities: Understanding the 1 in 5

2018-07-23T14:03:58-05:00

Building on NCLD’s 40-year history as the leading authority on learning disabilities, The State of Learning Disabilities: Understanding the 1 in 5 report uses recently released data for the 2015–2016 school year and other field-leading research to shine a light on the current challenges and opportunities facing the 1 in 5 children who have learning and attention issues such as dyslexia and ADHD. […]

The State of Learning Disabilities: Understanding the 1 in 52018-07-23T14:03:58-05:00
30 06, 2017

5 Reasons Why Presuming Competence is ALWAYS a Good Idea

2018-07-23T14:04:52-05:00

This is an article that Kim, PRN Training & Evaluations Specialist, gives to everyone who works with her son, Hayden. I think all teachers have had students who led them to that “ah-ha” experience that helped them realize why they got into teaching in the first place. The students were eager, curious, funny, stubborn, persistent, or just plain nice kids. It happened for me back in 1992. I was doing some school reform and inclusive education work with a newly built high school in southern New Hampshire. On my first day at the school, I met two incoming 9th graders, both [...]

5 Reasons Why Presuming Competence is ALWAYS a Good Idea2018-07-23T14:04:52-05:00
22 04, 2016

Higher Expectations to Better Outcomes for Children with Disabilities

2019-05-30T11:16:54-05:00

Unfortunately, too many of the 6.5 million children and youth with disabilities in this country leave high school without the knowledge and skills they need to be successful in a 21st century, global economy. While the vast majority of students in special education do not have significant cognitive impairments that prohibit them from learning rigorous academic content, fewer than 10 percent of eighth graders with disabilities are proficient in reading and math on the National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP). Too often, students’ educational opportunities are limited by low expectations. We must do better.

Higher Expectations to Better Outcomes for Children with Disabilities2019-05-30T11:16:54-05:00

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